Uluru Sunset Tour with Optional BBQ Dinner | $ 75

Special Expires 31 Mar 2021

Uluru (Ayers Rock) Sunset Tour
Uluru (Ayers Rock) Sunset Tour

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Uluru Sacred Sites & Sunset Tour with Optional BBQ Dinner | $ 135

Special Expires 31 Mar 2030

Uluru Sacred Sites & Sunset Half-Day Trip with Optional Outback BBQ
Uluru Sacred Sites & Sunset Half-Day Trip with Optional Outback BBQ

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Uluru Sunrise & Kata Tjuta Half Day Trip | $ 145

Special Expires 31 Mar 2030

Uluru Sunrise & Kata Tjuta Half Day Trip
Uluru Sunrise & Kata Tjuta Half Day Trip

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Uluru Sunrise & Guided Base Walk | $ 139

Special Expires 31 Mar 2030

Uluru Sunrise & Guided Base Walk
Uluru Sunrise & Guided Base Walk

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Kings Canyon & Outback Panoramas (returns to Uluru) | $ 235

Special Expires 31 Mar 2030

Kings Canyon & Outback Panoramas (returns to Uluru)
Kings Canyon & Outback Panoramas (returns to Uluru)

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About Uluru Day Tours

Uluru (Ayers Rock)

Uluru (Ayers Rock)

Uluru – Kata Tjuta National Park is home to the world famous Uluru (Ayers Rock), the physical red heart Australia and one of Australia’s most iconic natural landmarks. The monolith stands at a towering 348 metres tall and has a circumference of over 9 kilometres, with the bulk of its mass lying underground.

In 1873, surveyor William Gosse sighted ‘the Rock’ and in honour of the then Chief Secretary of South Australia Sir Henry Ayers, named it Ayers Rock. It wasn’t until 1993 that Uluru became the first icon in Australia to be given back its Aboriginal name and making it the first official dual-named feature in the Northern Territory.

The perfect place to view the sunrise at Uluru and Kata Tjuta is from the Talinguṟu Nyakunytjaku viewing area. Offering uninterrupted 360° views here you can witness the magnificent glow of the sun bring the surrounding desert landscape to life.

After a day of exploring, you can take in the unforgettable experience of an Uluru sunset. Feel the magic of the outback as you sip on a glass of wine and witness the ever changing colours of Uluru. Essentially grey, the oxidation of iron on the surface of the rock gives it a striking orange-red hue and is responsible for creating its radiant glow.

Stop by the Uluru – Kata Tjuta National Park Cultural Centre, the best place to get acquainted with the Anangu country. A wander through the “Tjukurpa Tunnel” will introduce you to the culture of the Anangu people and Aboriginal law (Tjukurpa). Learn about Aboriginal creation stories, ancestral beings, admire local art and discover the significance of the several walks available around the area.

For safety reasons the local Anangu request that visitors do not climb Uluru. Although not prohibited, it’s recommended that travellers respect their wishes while on Anangu land. There are several other ways to experience the sacred beauty of this ancient monolith such as on the insightful walks around its base or a scenic helicopter flight over the top.

Discover this intriguing World Heritage Listed wonder as you follow in the footsteps of the land’s ancestral beings absorbing the stories sacred to the Anangu community. The natural beauty and rich culture of Uluru will be revealed as you explore the base by foot on the famed base walk, home to waterholes, unique desert flora, caves and ancient rock paintings.

The Kuniya Base Walk is an insightful track that leads to Muṯitjulu waterhole, home of a wanampi, an ancestral watersnake. You’ll gain a unique insight into the sheer physical and spiritual enormity of Uluru and pass ancient cave paintings and other sites significant to the local Anangu and the early explorers.

The Mala Walk leads you past several areas of rock art and sacred sites where Aboriginal communities live and prepare for ceremony. It’s believed that as you walk through this area, you’ll be surrounded by the spirit of the Mala Tjukurpa – the hare-wallaby people. The walk will take you to the peaceful Kaṉtju Gorge.

However you choose to explore Uluru, you’ll no doubt gain an understanding of the innate spirituality and peacefulness that resounds from this ancient landscape. 

Kings Canyon

Kings Canyon

Just under 3 hours’ drive from Uluṟu (Ayers Rock) is the lesser known but equally remarkable Kings Canyon. This majestic chasm was formed over millions of years of erosion, slicing the earth 270 metres deep and is the biggest attraction in Watarrka National Park.

The canyon abounds with waterholes and casts a sheltering shadow over dense palm forests and native animals from the harsh desert surrounds lending to an interesting array of flora and fauna. The best way to explore Kings Canyon is to put on your walking shoes and explore the boulder strewn canyon floor or hike to the rim - a must for any Red Centre adventurer.

Meander along Kings Creek on the Creek Bed Walk and venture through the canyon gorge with the 100 metre cliff walls towering above you. The walk will lead you to views of the impressive canyon rim and take you past fossilized tracks of ancient marine creatures and ripple marks of the sea that once filled the gorge visible on the cliff faces.

Alternatively for those with a good level of fitness, the steep climb up and around the rim of the canyon’s sandstone walls offers marvellous views. This walk will also take you between the sandstone cliffs to the Garden of Eden, a tropical oasis with a natural spring waterhole surrounded by lush exotic plant life.

If hiking isn’t for you, take off on a helicopter flight and appreciate the grand scale of the canyon. Regardless of the experience you choose, it’ll definitely be worth every step and will leave you in awe of the scale and natural beauty of the region.


Uluru Day Tours Reviews

JP

Joanne P

AAT Kings tour from Uluru to Kings Canyonand the rim walk was absolutely the highlight of 4 days in Uluru. Everything else has been amazing. Sunrise, sunset, Uluru and Kata Tjuta were wonderful but for me the rim walk including great commentary from our guide Joanna was a highlight. The steps at the beginning are challenging but very doable. My husband and I are 66 and 58 and we had no problem being of average fitness to do this walk. It is truly stunning and every minute of the 3 and 1/2 hours was worth it. Make sure you do a loo stop before starting and sip water along the way. Take a million photos as nothing compares to this amazing walk. https://www.tripadvisor.com.au/ShowUserReviews-g256204-d264765-r179290339-Kings_Canyon-Red_Centre_Northern_Territory.html#

AW

Archie W

Amazing Scenery. Kings Canyon is a must-see Northern Territory location. If you travel to Uluru and the Olgas then be sure to visit Kings Canyon. The rim walk is spectacular with the steep section at the start of the walk, about 500 steps to the rim. Once on the top, the walk is relatively flat and easy. The descent also has a lot of steps and is as spectacular as the canyon itself. Start early to climb the steps in the cool of the morning and to see the changing colours of the rock face as the sun rises higher. The canyon is at least the equal of Uluru and the Olgas, and perhaps better! The walk will take you through smaller gorges, waterholes and lookouts over the rock formations and the plains of Watarrka National Park. This should not be missed if you are touring the Northern Territory.


Uluru Day Tours


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